True or False? The Truth About Fluoride

Fluoride

There is a lot of contradicting information put out into the world regarding fluoride, especially when it comes to children’s dental health. Fluoride is a mineral, that occurs naturally in water sources; when used correctly, it can improve early stages of tooth decay. Let’s explore some more facts about fluoride to help you and your children establish a well-rounded oral hygiene routine.

 

Fluoride is one of the best ways to prevent cavities.

A: True. Studies have indicated that fluoride is effective and the most efficient way to prevent tooth decay, one of the most common childhood diseases. Fluoride can be applied directly with toothpaste, mouth rinses or professionally administered with treatments by your dentist.

 

Fluoride protects teeth, makes them stronger from the bacteria that is in the food and beverages we consume.

A: True. As fluoride is absorbed, it provides added protection as it improves and repairs tooth enamel. The minerals that are deposited into your enamel will strengthen teeth, making them to resistant acid and bacteria.

 

Fluoride toothpaste is recommended for babies (with teeth) and toddlers by the American Dental Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Association of Pediatric Dentistry.

A: True. Stated safe and effective by each of these credible organizations, with the belief that fluoride use will help children have stronger teeth over their lifetime. Unless recommended otherwise by your dentist, the ADA recommends that once the first teeth start coming in, you should start using a fluoride toothpaste.

Guidelines

  • Begin brushing with a tiny amount of fluoride toothpaste (a smear, or the size of a rice grain). If they happen to swallow the fluoride, it will only be a small amount.
  • If your child can spit the toothpaste out, you can then use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.
  • Ideally, kids should be assisted with brushing their teeth until the age of five or six.

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